Amazon Prime – Totally Worth It

I joined Amazon Prime a year or so ago. Not only do I get free 2 day shipping on all my orders, they have fantastic customer service! So, I ordered some stuff that was supposed to show up a week before Christmas. Well, it never showed up. So I waited an extra week, just to be safe. At this point, I figured the package just got lost. So I started a live chat with an Amazon.com rep and in minutes I was told I will have a credit card refund. If I end up getting the items from UPS (I’ll be over here holding my breath), all I have to do is contact Amazon.com for a shipping label and I can ship them back at no charge.

That’s pretty awesome. I don’t know whether or not my outstanding customer service experience today is because I’m a Prime member, but I’d like to think it is. If not, then all the more reason to shop with Amazon.com.

Hallelujah!

Hallelujah!

Anyone who uses the JDK Date/Time API knows it, well, sucks. Badly.

Joda-Time was created to remedy the numerous shortcomings in the JDK’s stock Date/Time API. And it pretty much ruled for a very long time. Include it in my Maven POM and, boom!, just like that, I had a very good Date/Time API.

I wrote an article for IBM DeveloperWorks about Joda-Time in an attempt to share this news with those who didn’t know they had to suffer in silence.

So imagine when I read this article at JavaWorld about JSR-310. Basically Joda-Time’s (very few) design flaws will be fixed and the spirit of Joda-Time will be included in the JDK as part of Java 8 (at least, that is the plan). I’m sure that is not a completely accurate characterization of the situation, but basically the new JDK Date/Time API will be very familiar to anyone who has used Joda-Time.

–jsp